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JavaScript is one of the 3 languages all web developers must learn: 1. HTML to define the content of web pages. 2. CSS to specify the layout of web pages. 3. JavaScript to program the behavior of web pages. This tutorial covers every version of JavaScript: The Original JavaScript ES1 ES2 ES3 (1997-1999)
Bit operators work on 32 bits numbers. Any numeric operand in the operation is converted into a 32 bit number. The result is converted back to a JavaScript number. The examples above uses 4 bits unsigned examples. But JavaScript uses 32-bit signed numbers. Because of this, in JavaScript, ~ 5 will not return 10. It will return -6.
An arrow function expression is a compact alternative to a traditional function expression, but is limited and can't be used in all situations.. Differences & Limitations: Does not have its own bindings to this or super, and should not be used as methods. Does not have new.target keyword.; Not suitable for call, apply and bind methods, which generally rely on establishing a scope.
The nullish coalescing operator (??) is a logical operator that returns its right-hand side operand when its left-hand side operand is null or undefined, and otherwise returns its left-hand side operand. This can be contrasted with the logical OR (||) operator, which returns the right-hand side operand if the left operand is any falsy value, not only null or undefined.
The optional chaining operator provides a way to simplify accessing values through connected objects when it's possible that a reference or function may be undefined or null. For example, consider an object obj which has a nested structure. Without optional chaining, looking up a deeply-nested subproperty requires validating the references in between, such as:
Remember when performing comparisons, the equality operator (==) will attempt to make the data types the same before proceeding. On the other hand, the identity operator (===) requires both data types to be the same, as a prerequisite. Let’s understand with an example. See the code below : var valueOne = 3; var valueTwo = "3";
The inequality operator (!=) checks whether its two operands are not equal, returning a Boolean result. Unlike the strict inequality operator, it attempts to convert and compare operands that are of different types.
The 32-bit signed integer operand is inverted according to two's complement. That is, the presence of the most significant bit is used to express negative integers. Bitwise NOTing any number x yields - (x + 1). For example, ~-5 yields 4 . Note that due to using 32-bit representation for numbers both ~-1 and ~4294967295 (2^32 - 1) results in 0 .
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Node.js® is a JavaScript runtime built on Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine.
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